Memoizing async functions in Javascript

Memoizing async functions in Javascript

Memoization is a useful concept. It helps avoid time taking or expensive calculations after it's been done once. Applying memoization to a synchronous function is relatively straightforward. This article aims to introduce the overall concept behind memoization and then dive into the problems and their solutions while trying to memoize async functions.

Memoization

Let's start with memoizing a pure function. Let's say we have a function called getSquare, which returns the square of the given:

  function getSquare(x){
     return x * x
  }

To memoize this we can do something like this:


const memo = {}

function getSquare(x){
    if(memo.hasOwnProperty(x)) {
      return memo[x]
    }
    memo[x] = x * x
    return memo[x]
}

So, with few lines of code, we've memoized our getSquare function.

Let's create a memoize helper. It would accept a pure function as the first argument and agetKey function (which returns a unique key given argument of the function) as the second argument, to return a memoized version of the function:

function memoize(fn, getKey){
  const memo = {}
  return function memoized(...args){
     const key = getKey(...args)
     if(memo.hasOwnProperty(key)) return memo[key]

     memo[key] = fn.apply(this, args)
     return memo[key]
  }
}

We can apply this function to getSquare as follows:

const memoGetSquare = memoize(getSquare, num => num)

Memoizing a function accepting multiple arguments:

const getDivision = (a, b) => a/b

// memoizing using the helper
const memoGetDivision= memoize(getDivision, (a, b) => `${a}_${b}`)

Memoizing async functions

Let's say there' a function called expensiveOperation(key) which accepts a key as an argument and performs some async operation before returning the final result via a callback:

// does some async operation and invokes the callback with the final result

expensiveOperation(key, ( data) => {
   // Do something
})

Let's use similar notion as above to memoize this function:

const memo = {}

function memoExpensiveOperation(key, callback){
  if(memo.hasOwnProperty(key)){
    callback(memo[key])
    return
  } 

  expensiveOperation(key, data => {
   memo[key] = data
   callback(data)
  })
}

So that was pretty easy. But wait! It doesn't solve the whole problem yet. Consider the following scenario:

1- Invoked expensiveOperation with key 'a'

2- While #1 is still in progress, invoked it again with same key

The function would run twice for the same operation because #1 is yet to save the final data in memo. That's not something we wanted. We would instead want concurrent calls to be resolved at once after the earliest call is complete.

To address this issue we can track the operations currently in progress, say we do so by putting it in some sort of queue. Now, if we receive a call for an operation, while it's still in queue, we further enqueue the new call. This way we keep accumulating the repetitive calls and once the operation is done, all of these are processed in one go.

const memo = {}, progressQueues = {}

function memoExpensiveOperation(key, callback){
     if(memo.hasOwnProperty(key)){
       callback(memo[key])
       return
      }

     if(!progressQueues.hasOwnProperty(key)){
        // processing new key, create an entry for it in progressQueues
        progressQueues[key] = [callback]

      } else {
       // processing a key that's already being processed, enqueue it's callback and exit. 
        progressQueues[key].push(callback);
        return
      }

      expensiveOperation(key, (data) => {
           // memoize result
           memo[key] = data 
           // process all the enqueued items after it's done
           for(let callback of progressQueues[key]) {
                callback(data)
           }
           // clean up progressQueues
           delete progressQueue[key]
       })

}

We can go a step further, just like the last section, and create a re-usable helper say memoizeAsync:

function memoizeAsync(fn, getKey){
   const memo = {}, progressQueues = {}

   return function memoized(...allArgs){
       const callback = allArgs[allArgs.length-1]
       const args = allArgs.slice(0, -1)
       const key = getKey(...args)

        if(memo.hasOwnProperty(key)){
            callback(key)
            return
        }


        if( !progressQueues.hasOwnProperty(key) ){
           // processing new key, create an entry for it in progressQueues
           progressQueues[key] = [callback]
        } else {
           // processing a key that's already being processed, enqueue it's callback and exit. 
           progressQueues[key].push(callback);
           return
        }

        fn.call(this, ...args , (data) => {
           // memoize result
           memo[key] = data 
           // process all the enqueued items after it's done
           for(let callback of progressQueues[key]) {
                callback(data)
           }
           // clean up progressQueues
           delete progressQueue[key]
       })
   }
}

// USAGE

const memoExpensiveOperation = memoizeAsync(expensiveOperation, key => key)

Promises

Let's say we have a function processData(key) which accepts a key as argument and returns a Promise. Let's see how it can be memoized.

Memoizing the underlying promise:

Simplest way would be to memoize the promise issued against the key. Here's how it would look like:

const memo = {}
function memoProcessData(key){
  if(memo.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
    return memo[key]
  }

  memo[key] = processData(key) // memoize the promise for key
  return memo[key]
}

The code is fairly simple and self-explanatory here. We can use the memoize helper we created a while ago:

 const memoProcessData = memoize(processData, key => key)

Can we memoize the value returned by Promise?

Yes. We can apply the same approach as the callback here. Though it might be an overkill for the sake of memoizing such a function:

  const memo = {},  progressQueues = {}

  function memoProcessData(key){

    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      // if the operation has already been done before, simply resolve with that data and exit
      if(memo.hasOwnProperty(key)){
        resolve(memo[key])
        return;
      }

      if( !progressQueues.hasOwnProperty(key) ){
        // called for a new key, create an entry for it in progressQueues
        progressQueues[key] = [[resolve, reject]]

      } else {
       // called for a key that's still being processed, enqueue it's handlers and exit.         
        progressQueues[key].push([resolve, reject]);
        return;
      }


      processData(key)
        .then(data => {
            memo[key] = data; // memoize the returned data
            // process all the enqueued entries after successful operation
            for(let [resolver, ] of progressQueues[key])
              resolver(data)
        })
        .catch(error => {
           // process all the enqueued entries after failed operation
           for(let [, rejector] of progressQueues[key])
              rejector(error);
         })
        .finally(() => {
          // clean up progressQueues
           delete progressQueues[key]
         })
    })
  }

Further improvement

Since we're using a memo object to keep track of memoized operations, with too many calls to expensiveOperation with various keys(and each operation returning a sizeable chunk of data after processing) the size of this object may grow beyond what's ideal. To handle this scenario we can use a cache eviction policy such as LRU (Least Recently Used). It would ensure we're memoizing without crossing memory limits!

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